Furby

Mel playing Furby connect with her Furby

The furby I got her for Christmas finally connects on our phones now! She’s having a blast making it do stuff and things 😊

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Furby
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Melody on the game on the phone
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Silly Girl

20170317_180226Sweet lil Melody did this yesterday. She pulled out her side table, then pulled out her trundle bed, AND made it! I asked her why and she told me that Summer was spending the night. Of course, i ask why, and she explains because Summer is working and thats what girls do when they work. They spend the night with eachother. We still have yet to rearrange her room, lol!

Mel’s first Med bracelet

myid-sport-black-pinkWith the meds and all the dr’s shes working with, i figured its time for her to have one of her own. Just in case shes at school they can scan her in. It has a QR code, a website and phone number listed on the bracelet! So they will know who she is, what her issues are, and what to do. I just dont feel safe right now with her running around without one. Now its just going to be a matter of getting her to wear it!

I may just get a matching one!

My sweet baby girl…

…Suffers from a wide range of issues and its so frustrating to me at times. Its all because of the constant abuse by her half brother.
She suffers from

All managed by medication, but its still so sad to watch. Its so hard to live with. They are ready to put her on disability to get her more care. Lord help us through these hard times

    ADHD

    ADHD
    link is provided to complete article above

    ADHD Overview

    ADHD stands for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, a condition with symptoms such as inattentiveness, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. The symptoms differ from person to person. ADHD was formerly called ADD, or attention deficit disorder. Both children and adults can have ADHD, but the symptoms always begin in childhood. Adults with ADHD may have trouble managing time, being organized, setting goals, and holding down a job.

    Could someone you know have ADHD? Maybe they’re inattentive. Or they might be hyperactive and impulsive. They might have all those traits.
    There are three groups of symptoms:
    1. Inattention
    2. Hyperactivity
    3. Impulsivity
    Get the facts on all of them, and learn examples of behaviors that can come with each.

    Inattention

    You might not notice it until a child goes to school. In adults, it may be easier to notice at work or in social situations.
    The person might procrastinate, not complete tasks like homework or chores, or frequently move from one uncompleted activity to another.
    They might also:
    • Be disorganized
    • Lack focus
    • Have a hard time paying attention to details and a tendency to make careless mistakes. Their work might be messy and seem careless.
    • Have trouble staying on topic while talking, not listening to others, and not following social rules
    • Be forgetful about daily activities (for example, missing appointments, forgetting to bring lunch)
    • Be easily distracted by things like trivial noises or events that are usually ignored by others.

    Hyperactivity

    It may vary with age. You might be able to notice it in preschoolers. ADHD symptoms nearly always show up before middle school.
    Kids with hyperactivity may:
    • Fidget and squirm when seated.
    • Get up frequently to walk or run around.
    • Run or climb a lot when it’s not appropriate. (In teens this may seem like restlessness.)
    • Have trouble playing quietly or doing quiet hobbies
    • Always be “on the go”
    • Talk excessively
    Toddlers and preschoolers with ADHD tend to be constantly in motion, jumping on furniture and having trouble participating in group activities that call for them to sit still. For instance, they may have a hard time listening to a story.
    School-age children have similar habits, but you may notice those less often. They are unable to stay seated, squirm a lot, fidget, or talk a lot.
    Hyperactivity can show up as feelings of restlessness in teens and adults. They may also have a hard time doing quiet activities where you sit still.

    Impulsivity

    Symptoms of this include:
    • Impatience
    • Having a hard time waiting to talk or react

    Childhood Mood diorder

    Mood disorder:

    Overview of Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    What are mood disorders?

    A category of mental health problems that includes all types of depression and bipolar disorder, mood disorders are sometimes called affective disorders.
    During the 1980s, mental health professionals began to recognize symptoms of mood disorders in children and adolescents, as well as adults. However, children and adolescents do not necessarily have or exhibit the same symptoms as adults. It is more difficult to diagnose mood disorders in children, especially because children are not always able to express how they feel. Today, clinicians and researchers believe that mood disorders in children and adolescents remain one of the most underdiagnosed mental health problems. Mood disorders in adolescents also put them at risk for other conditions (most often anxiety disorder, disruptive behavior, and substance abuse disorders) that may persist long after the initial episodes of depression are resolved.

    What causes mood disorders?

    What causes mood disorders in adolescents is not well known. There are chemicals in the brain that are responsible for positive moods. Other chemicals in the brain, called neurotransmitters, regulate the brain chemicals that affect mood. Mood disorders may be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, on its own or along with environmental factors, such as unexpected life events and/or chronic stress.
    Mood disorders can run in families and are considered to be “multifactorially inherited,” meaning that many factors are involved. The factors that produce the trait or condition are usually both genetic and environmental, involving a combination of genes from both parents. If a mother passes a mood disorder trait to her children, a daughter is more likely to have the disorder. If a father passes a mood disorder trait to his children, a son is more likely to have the disorder. 

    Who is affected by mood disorders?

    Anyone can feel sad or depressed at times. But mood disorders are more intense and difficult to manage than normal feelings of sadness. Children, adolescents, or adults who have a parent with a mood disorder have a greater chance of also having a mood disorder, although it is not a guarantee that this will happen. However, life events and stress can expose or exaggerate feelings of sadness or depression, making the feelings more difficult to manage.
    Sometimes, life’s problems can trigger depression. Being fired from a job, getting divorced, losing a loved one, death in the family, and financial trouble, to name a few, all can be difficult and coping with the pressure may be troublesome. These life events and stress can bring on feelings of sadness or depression or make a mood disorder harder to manage, depending on your coping skills and resiliency.
    Females in the general population are 70% more likely to experience depression than males. Once a person in the family has this diagnosis, the chance for his or her siblings or children to have the same diagnosis is increased. In addition, relatives of people with depression are also at increased risk for bipolar disorder.
    The chance for bipolar disorder in males and females in the general population is about 2.6%. Once a person in the family has this diagnosis, the chance for his or her siblings or children to have the same diagnosis is increased. In addition, relatives of people with bipolar disorder are also at increased risk for other forms of depression.

    What are the different types of mood disorders?

    The following are the most common types of mood disorders experienced by children and adolescents:
    • Major depression. A period of a depressed or irritable mood or a noticeable decrease in interest or pleasure in usual activities, along with other signs, lasting at least two weeks.
    • Persistent depressive disorder (dysthymia). A chronic, low-grade, depressed or irritable mood for at least 1 year.
    • Bipolar disorder. Manic episodes (period of persistently elevated mood), interspersed with depressed periods, or periods of flat or blunted emotional response. 
    • Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder. A persistent irritability and extreme inability to control behavior exhibited in children under the age of 18. 
    • Premenstrual dysmorphic disorder. This includes depressive symptoms, irritability, and tension before menstruation. 
    • Mood disorder due to a general medical condition. Many medical illnesses (including cancer, injuries, infections, and chronic medical illnesses) can trigger symptoms of depression.
    • Substance-induced mood disorder. Symptoms of depression that are due to the effects of medication or other forms of treatment, drug abuse, or exposure to toxins.

    What are the symptoms of mood disorders?

    Adolescents, depending on their age and the type of mood disorder present, may show different symptoms of depression. The following are the most common symptoms of a mood disorder. But each adolescent and adolescent may show symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:
    • Persistent feelings of sadness
    • Feeling hopeless or helpless
    • Having low self-esteem
    • Feeling inadequate
    • Excessive guilt
    • Feelings of wanting to die
    • Loss of interest in usual activities or activities once enjoyed
    • Difficulty with relationships
    • Sleep disturbances (for example, insomnia, or hypersomnia)
    • Changes in appetite or weight
    • Decreased energy
    • Difficulty concentrating
    • A decrease in the ability to make decisions
    • Suicidal thoughts or attempts
    • Frequent physical complaints (for example, headache, stomachache, or fatigue)
    • Running away or threats of running away from home
    • Hypersensitivity to failure or rejection
    • Irritability, hostility, aggression
    In mood disorders, these feelings appear more intense than adolescents normally feel from time to time. It is also of concern if these feelings continue over a period of time, or interfere with an adolescent’s interest in being with friends or taking part in daily activities at home or school. Any adolescent who expresses thoughts of suicide should be evaluated immediately.
    Other signs of possible mood disorders in adolescents may include:
    • Difficulty achieving in school
    • Constant anger
    • Rebellious behaviors
    • Trouble with family
    • Difficulty with friends and peers
    The symptoms of mood disorders may resemble other conditions or psychiatric problems. Always consult your adolescent’s health care provider for a diagnosis.

    How are mood disorders diagnosed?

    Mood disorders are real medical conditions. They are not something an adolescent will likely just “get over.”
    A child psychiatrist or other mental health professional usually diagnoses mood disorders following a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation. An evaluation of the adolescent’s family, when possible, in addition to information provided by teachers and care providers may also be helpful in making a diagnosis.

    Treatment for mood disorders

    Specific treatment for mood disorders will be determined by your adolescent’s health care provider based on:
    • Your adolescent’s age, overall health, and medical history
    • Extent of your adolescent’s symptoms
    • Type of mood disorder
    • Your adolescent’s tolerance for specific medications or therapies
    • Expectations for the course of the condition
    • Your opinion or preference
    Mood disorders can often be effectively treated. Treatment should always be based on a comprehensive evaluation of the adolescent and family. Treatment may include one, or more, of the following:
    • Medications (especially when combined with psychotherapy has shown to be very effective in the treatment of mood disorders in children and teens)
    • Psychotherapy (most often cognitive-behavioral and/or interpersonal therapy) for the adolescent (focused on changing the adolescent’s distorted views of themselves and the environment around them; working through difficult relationships; identifying stressors in the adolescent’s environment and how to avoid them)
    • Family therapy
    • Consultation with the adolescent’s school
    Parents play a vital supportive role in any treatment process.

    Prevention of mood disorders

    Preventive measures to reduce the incidence of mood disorders in adolescents are not known at this time. However, early detection and intervention can reduce the severity of symptoms, enhance the adolescent’s normal growth and development, and improve the quality of life experienced by adolescents with mood disorders.

    Childhood Anxiety

    Childhood anxiety

    What Is Anxiety?

    Anxiety is really just a form of stress. It can be experienced in many different ways — physically, emotionally, and in the way people view the world around them. Anxiety mainly relates to worry about what might happen — worrying about things going wrong or feeling like you’re in some kind of danger.
    Anxiety is a natural human reaction, and it serves an important biological function: It’s an alarm system that’s activated whenever we perceive danger or a threat. When the body and mind react, we can feel physical sensations, like dizziness, a rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, and sweaty or shaky hands and feet. These sensations — called the fight–flight response — are caused by a rush of adrenaline and other stress hormones that prepare the body to make a quick getaway or “flight” from danger.
    The fight–flight response happens instantly. But it usually takes a few seconds longer for the thinking part of the brain (the cortex) to process the situation and evaluate whether the threat is real, and if so, how to handle it. When the cortex sends the all-clear signal, the fight–flight response is deactivated and the nervous system starts to calm down.

    Childhood Depression

    Lets hit Childhood depression:

    Can Children Really Suffer From Depression?

    Yes. Childhood depression is different from the normal “blues” and everyday emotions that occur as a child develops. Just because a child seems sad doesn’t necessarily mean he or she has significant depression. If the sadness becomes persistent, or if disruptive behavior that interferes with normal social activities, interests, schoolwork, or family life develops, it may indicate that he or she has a depressive illness. Keep in mind that while depression is a serious illness, it is also a treatable one.

    How Can I Tell if My Child Is Depressed?

    The symptoms of depression in children vary. It is often undiagnosed and untreated because they are passed off as normal emotional and psychological changes that occur during growth. Early medical studies focused on “masked” depression, where a child’s depressed mood was evidenced by acting out or angry behavior. While this does occur, particularly in younger children, many children display sadness or low mood similar to adults who are depressed. The primary symptoms of depression revolve around sadness, a feeling of hopelessness, and mood changes.
    Signs and symptoms of depression in children include:
    • Irritability or anger
    • Continuous feelings of sadness and hopelessness
    • Social withdrawal
    • Increased sensitivity to rejection
    • Changes in appetite — either increased or decreased
    • Changes in sleep — sleeplessness or excessive sleep
    • Vocal outbursts or crying
    • Difficulty concentrating
    • Fatigue and low energy
    • Physical complaints (such as stomachaches, headaches) that don’t respond to treatment
    • Reduced ability to function during events and activities at home or with friends, in school, extracurricular activities, and in other hobbies or interests
    • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt
    • Impaired thinking or concentration
    • Thoughts of death or suicide
    Not all children have all of these symptoms. In fact, most will display different symptoms at different times and in different settings. Although some children may continue to function reasonably well in structured environments, most kids with significant depression will suffer a noticeable change in social activities, loss of interest in school and poor academic performance, or a change in appearance. Children may also begin using drugs or alcohol, especially if they are over age 12.
    Although relatively rare in youths under 12, young children do attempt suicide — and may do so impulsively when they are upset or angry. Girls are more likely to attempt suicide, but boys are more likely to actually kill themselves when they make an attempt. Children with a family history of violence, alcohol abuse, or physical or sexual abuse are at greater risk for suicide, as are those with depressive symptoms.

    PTSD


    Ill post them one per post so it doesnt get confusing.

     Lets start with the PTSD:

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Definition

    PTSD is a disorder that develops in some people who have experienced a shocking, scary, or dangerous event.
    It is natural to feel afraid during and after a traumatic situation. Fear triggers many split-second changes in the body to help defend against danger or to avoid it. This “fight-or-flight” response is a typical reaction meant to protect a person from harm. Nearly everyone will experience a range of reactions after trauma, yet most people recover from initial symptoms naturally. Those who continue to experience problems may be diagnosed with PTSD. People who have PTSD may feel stressed or frightened even when they are not in danger.

    Signs and Symptoms

    Not every traumatized person develops ongoing (chronic) or even short-term (acute) PTSD. Not everyone with PTSD has been through a dangerous event. Some experiences, like the sudden, unexpected death of a loved one, can also cause PTSD. Symptoms usually begin early, within 3 months of the traumatic incident, but sometimes they begin years afterward. Symptoms must last more than a month and be severe enough to interfere with relationships or work to be considered PTSD. The course of the illness varies. Some people recover within 6 months, while others have symptoms that last much longer. In some people, the condition becomes chronic.
    A doctor who has experience helping people with mental illnesses, such as a psychiatrist or psychologist, can diagnose PTSD.
    To be diagnosed with PTSD, an adult must have all of the following for at least 1 month:
    • At least one re-experiencing symptom
    • At least one avoidance symptom
    • At least two arousal and reactivity symptoms
    • At least two cognition and mood symptoms

    Re-experiencing symptoms include:

    • Flashbacks—reliving the trauma over and over, including physical symptoms like a racing heart or sweating
    • Bad dreams
    • Frightening thoughts
    Re-experiencing symptoms may cause problems in a person’s everyday routine. The symptoms can start from the person’s own thoughts and feelings. Words, objects, or situations that are reminders of the event can also trigger re-experiencing symptoms.

    Avoidance symptoms include:

    • Staying away from places, events, or objects that are reminders of the traumatic experience
    • Avoiding thoughts or feelings related to the traumatic event
    Things that remind a person of the traumatic event can trigger avoidance symptoms. These symptoms may cause a person to change his or her personal routine. For example, after a bad car accident, a person who usually drives may avoid driving or riding in a car.

    Arousal and reactivity symptoms include:

    • Being easily startled
    • Feeling tense or “on edge”
    • Having difficulty sleeping
    • Having angry outbursts
    Arousal symptoms are usually constant, instead of being triggered by things that remind one of the traumatic events. These symptoms can make the person feel stressed and angry. They may make it hard to do daily tasks, such as sleeping, eating, or concentrating.

    Cognition and mood symptoms include:

    • Trouble remembering key features of the traumatic event
    • Negative thoughts about oneself or the world
    • Distorted feelings like guilt or blame
    • Loss of interest in enjoyable activities
    Cognition and mood symptoms can begin or worsen after the traumatic event, but are not due to injury or substance use. These symptoms can make the person feel alienated or detached from friends or family members. 
    It is natural to have some of these symptoms after a dangerous event. Sometimes people have very serious symptoms that go away after a few weeks. This is called acute stress disorder, or ASD. When the symptoms last more than a month, seriously affect one’s ability to function, and are not due to substance use, medical illness, or anything except the event itself, they might be PTSD. Some people with PTSD don’t show any symptoms for weeks or months. PTSD is often accompanied by depression, substance abuse, or one or more of the other anxiety disorders.

    Do children react differently than adults?

    Children and teens can have extreme reactions to trauma, but their symptoms may not be the same as adults. In very young children (less than 6 years of age), these symptoms can include:
    • Wetting the bed after having learned to use the toilet
    • Forgetting how to or being unable to talk
    • Acting out the scary event during playtime
    • Being unusually clingy with a parent or other adult
    Older children and teens are more likely to show symptoms similar to those seen in adults. They may also develop disruptive, disrespectful, or destructive behaviors. Older children and teens may feel guilty for not preventing injury or deaths. They may also have thoughts of revenge. For additional information, visit the Learn More section below. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) offers free print materials in English and Spanish. These can be read online, downloaded, or delivered to you in the mail.

    Risk Factors

    Anyone can develop PTSD at any age. This includes war veterans, children, and people who have been through a physical or sexual assault, abuse, accident, disaster, or many other serious events. According to the National Center for PTSD , about 7 or 8 out of every 100 people will experience PTSD at some point in their lives. Women are more likely to develop PTSD than men, and genes may make some people more likely to develop PTSD than others.
    Not everyone with PTSD has been through a dangerous event. Some people develop PTSD after a friend or family member experiences danger or harm. The sudden, unexpected death of a loved one can also lead to PTSD.

    Why do some people develop PTSD and other people do not?

    It is important to remember that not everyone who lives through a dangerous event develops PTSD. In fact, most people will not develop the disorder.
    Many factors play a part in whether a person will develop PTSD. Some examples are listed below. Risk factors make a person more likely to develop PTSD. Other factors, called resilience factors, can help reduce the risk of the disorder.

    Risk Factors and Resilience Factors for PTSD

    Some factors that increase risk for PTSD include:
    • Living through dangerous events and traumas
    • Getting hurt
    • Seeing another person hurt, or seeing a dead body
    • Childhood trauma
    • Feeling horror, helplessness, or extreme fear
    • Having little or no social support after the event
    • Dealing with extra stress after the event, such as loss of a loved one, pain and injury, or loss of a job or home
    • Having a history of mental illness or substance abuse
    Some resilience factors that may reduce the risk of PTSD include:
    • Seeking out support from other people, such as friends and family
    • Finding a support group after a traumatic event
    • Learning to feel good about one’s own actions in the face of danger
    • Having a positive coping strategy, or a way of getting through the bad event and learning from it
    • Being able to act and respond effectively despite feeling fear
    Researchers are studying the importance of these and other risk and resilience factors, including genetics and neurobiology. With more research, someday it may be possible to predict who is likely to develop PTSD and to prevent it.

    Treatments and Therapies

    The main treatments for people with PTSD are medications, psychotherapy (“talk” therapy), or both. Everyone is different, and PTSD affects people differently so a treatment that works for one person may not work for another. It is important for anyone with PTSD to be treated by a mental health provider who is experienced with PTSD. Some people with PTSD need to try different treatments to find what works for their symptoms.
    If someone with PTSD is going through an ongoing trauma, such as being in an abusive relationship, both of the problems need to be addressed. Other ongoing problems can include panic disorder, depression, substance abuse, and feeling suicidal.

    Medications

    The most studied medications for treating PTSD include antidepressants, which may help control PTSD symptoms such as sadness, worry, anger, and feeling numb inside. Antidepressants and other medications may be prescribed along with psychotherapy. Other medications may be helpful for specific PTSD symptoms. For example, although it is not currently FDA approved, research has shown that Prazosin may be helpful  with sleep problems, particularly nightmares, commonly experienced by people with PTSD.
    Doctors and patients can work together to find the best medication or medication combination, as well as the right dose. Check the U.S. Food and Drug Administration website (http://www.fda.gov/ ) for the latest information on patient medication guides, warnings, or newly approved medications.

    Psychotherapy

    Psychotherapy (sometimes called “talk therapy”) involves talking with a mental health professional to treat a mental illness. Psychotherapy can occur one-on-one or in a group. Talk therapy treatment for PTSD usually lasts 6 to 12 weeks, but it can last longer. Research shows that support from family and friends can be an important part of recovery.
    Many types of psychotherapy can help people with PTSD. Some types target the symptoms of PTSD directly. Other therapies focus on social, family, or job-related problems. The doctor or therapist may combine different therapies depending on each person’s needs.
    Effective psychotherapies tend to emphasize a few key components, including education about symptoms, teaching skills to help identify the triggers of symptoms, and skills to manage the symptoms. One helpful form of therapy is called cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT. CBT can include:
    • Exposure therapy. This helps people face and control their fear. It gradually exposes them to the trauma they experienced in a safe way. It uses imagining, writing, or visiting the place where the event happened. The therapist uses these tools to help people with PTSD cope with their feelings.
    • Cognitive restructuring. This helps people make sense of the bad memories. Sometimes people remember the event differently than how it happened. They may feel guilt or shame about something that is not their fault. The therapist helps people with PTSD look at what happened in a realistic way.
    There are other types of treatment that can help as well. People with PTSD should talk about all treatment options with a therapist. Treatment should equip individuals with the skills to manage their symptoms and help them participate in activities that they enjoyed before developing PTSD.
    How Talk Therapies Help People Overcome PTSD
    Talk therapies teach people helpful ways to react to the frightening events that trigger their PTSD symptoms. Based on this general goal, different types of therapy may:
    • Teach about trauma and its effects
    • Use relaxation and anger-control skills
    • Provide tips for better sleep, diet, and exercise habits
    • Help people identify and deal with guilt, shame, and other feelings about the event
    • Focus on changing how people react to their PTSD symptoms. For example, therapy helps people face reminders of the trauma.

    Beyond Treatment: How can I help myself?

    It may be very hard to take that first step to help yourself. It is important to realize that although it may take some time, with treatment, you can get better. If you are unsure where to go for help, ask your family doctor. You can also check NIMH’s Help for Mental Illnesses page or search online for “mental health providers,” “social services,” “hotlines,” or “physicians” for phone numbers and addresses. An emergency room doctor can also provide temporary help and can tell you where and how to get further help.
    To help yourself while in treatment:
    • Talk with your doctor about treatment options
    • Engage in mild physical activity or exercise to help reduce stress
    • Set realistic goals for yourself
    • Break up large tasks into small ones, set some priorities, and do what you can as you can
    • Try to spend time with other people, and confide in a trusted friend or relative. Tell others about things that may trigger symptoms.
    • Expect your symptoms to improve gradually, not immediately
    • Identify and seek out comforting situations, places, and people
    Caring for yourself and others is especially important when large numbers of people are exposed to traumatic events (such as natural disasters, accidents, and violent acts). For more information, see the Learn More section, below.

    Next Steps for PTSD Research

    In the last decade, progress in research on the mental and biological foundations of PTSD has lead scientists to focus on better understanding the underlying causes of why people experience a range of reactions to trauma.
    • NIMH-funded researchers are exploring trauma patients in acute care settings to better understand the changes that occur in individuals whose symptoms improve naturally.
    • Other research is looking at how fear memories are affected by learning, changes in the body, or even sleep.
    • Research on preventing the development of PTSD soon after trauma exposure is also under way.
    • Still other research is attempting to identify what factors determine whether someone with PTSD will respond well to one type of intervention or another, aiming to develop more personalized, effective, and efficient treatments.
    • As gene research and brain imaging technologies continue to improve, scientists are more likely to be able to pinpoint when and where in the brain PTSD begins. This understanding may then lead to better targeted treatments to suit each person’s own needs or even prevent the disorder before it causes harm.